Car Paint Protection

Do you know how these treatments actually work and how they differ from one another?

Polishes

Polish is one of those products that is best used at the very end of a car cleaning task, and for good reason. They are thicker than water, but not quite as thick as wax. This thinner consistency means that they can be applied with a spray can and then massaged into the surface of a car’s paintwork with a cloth – but there are even certain products that are like mists and can simply be sprayed across a bonnet and then left to settle. Many of these products even possess UV protection, making them even more suitable for safeguarding a paintjob from the sun.

Waxes

There are some named brands in the business that specialise in car wax products. They are all fairly similar, unless they state that their formulas contain exclusive ingredients and chemicals – but in any event, a good supplier will provide a wide range of suitable waxes. These products will usually need to be wiped over the surface of a car’s bonnet, doors and boot – and this can be a little time consuming. Once the job is done there’s no better way to protect a car without a cover. The wax is thick enough to repel sunlight and rain, but once dried, it can also create a protective layer that can deflect rocks that can cause chips and dings.

Creams

There are some products that rely on a unique formula that takes on the appearance of shaving foam, but then breaks down to create an oily liquid that can be used to protect the paintwork of a car. They can be a little more expensive and are often seen used on expensive vehicles, but that doesn’t mean that they can’t also be suitable for anyone wanting to take advantage of their features. They can be rubbed on much like wax, but won’t be as thick, instead relying on their oily composition to deter UV rays, rain drops and the elements in general.

Buffers

Buffers are less of a usable product and more of a tool, but they are incredible effective nonetheless. Most modern buffers take on the appearance of a handheld device, with a soft sponge on one end that can be interchangeable depending on the need. The good thing about these tools is that they can be paired with waxes, polishes and creams, and can often buff the exterior of a vehicle to a level of shine that can’t easily be achieved by hand. Furthermore, they can be used with just water, acting to remove stains and even scratches from the surface of a car, whilst providing a great sheen that can be seen and enjoyed from metres away.